Koetsu, Ortofon SPU, Supex, Hartley Electrovoice and Dahlquist!

SPU

SPU

Leak TL=25

Leak TL=25

Hartley

Hartley

Some very desirable classic gear available now. Ending Saturday.

John is selling lots of his collectipn of tare and unusual stuff. Look at his ebay identity accoustic null

http://www.ebay.com.au/sch/acoustic_null/m.html?item=141810179846&ssPageName=STRK%3AMESE%3AIT&rt=nc&_trksid=p2047675.l2562

And at Ray’s there is an interesting pair of Dahlquist DC10 speakers. Really worth hearing; if you’ve never hear these before, they are time aligned with mostly open baffles, electrostatic sound but with bass. And an interesting Kreisler valve radio. I don’t knoe anything about valve radios but I’m sure Steve will answer any queries.
Ray promises to play any CDs you bring on Saturday, come and compare the Dahlquists with the Puresound and other speakers.

Electrovoice

Electrovoice

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Melbourne Audio Club November and December

Upcoming meetings at the MAC

I had a chat to Ian and Bev from Rockian trading a few days ago. The were excited about the Melbourne Audio Club meeting on Wed 18 November this year. New stocks of highest quality vinyl records have arrived (some in stock at Hifi Exchange). Ian and Bev will be playing some examples of new discs with Greg Osborne- this is always one of the most entertaining evenings of the year. Greg always brings top shelf equipment and Ian has lots of anecdotes. An evening not to be missed. Bring cash or your credit card.

Then the Do It Yourself meeting will be on the 16 December. David was finalising the projects, another enyertaining evening. It has ben a long time since we’ve had projects that let the smoke out! I’m sure the level of engineering and finish will be impeccable,

Visit Ray at the Hi FI Exchange

The Hifi Exchange website has not been updated due to a problem at the server. SO call or email Ray .
There are plenty of new new vinyl LPs that have just come in and a good range of turntables including the Project that is currently on demo, and the superb Sota Sapphire.
I also saw a great Luxman CL32 (valve) preamp and a Luxman Laboratory Reference power amp.

Bluesound at Melbourne Audio Club

If you missed the meeting Wednesday 21 October this is what happened:
Mike from Convoy audio gave a very interesting point of view about streaming and streaming services and higher resolution. This is undoubtedly the way to source music as soon as Tidal and other high res services become available in Australia. Apple could easily switch on high res and become the market leader.
Downloads are the best option at the moment, an immense library is available even though you might need a VPN (virtual private network) to get around some geoblocking. Or, just use Spotify or Pandora or even Apple to get a taste of what’s availble and then buy the disc or HD download.
As far as sound quality goes there is no doubt that Bluesound Powernode 2 is value for money.
Easy to use, controlled with your smartphone or tablet with the supplied software and with an integrated 60W (8 Ohm) digital amplifier similar to the good sounding NAD D3020.
The demonstated speakers where white B&W CM6 series2, very pretty and typical B&W sound with excellent and extended high frequencies thanks to the new tweeter.

TECHNICAL SPECIFICATIONS
Type: Two-way, rear ported standmount
loudspeaker
Driver complement: 1x 25mm
Decoupled Dome aluminium tweeter,
1x 165mm Kevlar cone mid/bass unit
Frequency response: 50Hz-28kHz ±3dB
Sensitivity: 88dB SPL
Nominal impedance: 8Ω (minimum
3.7Ω)
Crossover frequency: 4kHz
Recommended power: 30W-120W
Finishes: Gloss Black, Satin White,
Rosenut
Dimensions (HxWxD): 403x200x301mm
Weight: 8.9kg
Price: $395/pr (stands $699/pr) APPROX.
Manufactured by Bowers & Wilkins

Finally, a great selection of music on the night, most genres and some unusual tracks from the Eltham Primary School Choir. Well done Nick!

Unimog portable sound system (Wall st journal)

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A Sound Machine With Places to Go

The Space Cowboys, a music collective, have created a ‘Unimog,’ which is effectively a mobile sound system

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‘The Space Cowboys,’ a collective from the popular Burning Man festival, have converted a Mercedes Unimog military truck into the ultimate party on wheels. Photo: Jason Henry for The Wall Street Journal

Steve Hwang, a member of the San Francisco-based music and art collective Space Cowboys, on the group’s “Unimog,” as told to A.J. Baime.

The idea for the Mog first came in 2000, and a lot of the original inspiration was Burning Man (an annual gathering in the Nevada desert). We wanted to create an urban assault vehicle that plays music, a fully self-contained mobile sound and video system.

We started with a 1973 Mercedes Unimog 404 that we got through an importer in Vallejo, Calif. The vehicle was originally created to be a military radio truck, and it’s popular in the four-wheeling community because it has such high ground clearance and bullet-proof engineering. Once we had the truck, we started the build-out.

So many pitched in. Space Cowboys is a collective of people with many different talents—fabricating, sound engineering, mechanical expertise, and music production. When we started bringing the Mog to parties, it was pretty difficult. We had to tow speakers, generators, and other equipment in a second vehicle. My contribution was to make the Mog more plug-and-play. Everything is built-in and, ideally, deploys at the push of a button.

A Sound Machine With Places to Go

The Space Cowboys, a music collective, have created a ‘Unimog,’ which is effectively a mobile sound system

Members of the San Francisco-based art and music collective Space Cowboys. The Mog was a group effort. ‘We just want to create our own sound, our own vibe, and to share it with our friends and our community,’ says Mr. Hwang. ‘And mobility is a huge part of it.’
CAPTIONS<br>

Steve Hwang, a member of the San Francisco-based art and music collective Space Cowboys,’ with the group’s Mog—a fully-mobile sound and video party machine—photographed here in Oakland, Calif.
The Mog began life as a 1973 Mercedes Unimog 404. The vehicle was originally created as a military radio truck. On the Space Cowboy’s website, it is now referred to as an All-Terrain Audio Visual Assault Vehicle (an ATAVAV).
Members of the crew deploying the sound equipment. Up top: four stadium speakers that rise out of the cab on pneumatic lifts.
‘Ripe is kind of a tag line that stuck,’ says Mr. Hwang. Members of the Space Cowboys collective had gotten ahold of a roll of ‘Ripe’ stickers that go on produce in a supermarket. ‘It’s become a bit of a mantra.’
A look at the Mog’s onboard electrical closet. The truck utilizes four amplifiers: two 8,000-watt amps and two 4,000-watt amps.
Mr. Hwang in the back of the Mog, surrounded by four fold-out subwoofers.
The platform in front of the Ripe flag is what the DJ stands on during gigs.
The subwoofers fold into the cab for safe transportation.
Mr. Hwang drives the Mog to gigs. ‘It can crawl up a wall,’ he says. ‘In first gear, you get to about three mph. In second, maybe five. In third, you’re ready to roll.’
An overhead shot of the cockpit.
Another view of the electrical equipment. ‘It’s not your typical home stereo setup,’ says Mr. Hwang of the Mog.
The booth usually holds one DJ at a time, but two can fit.
‘Needless to say,’ Mr. Hwang notes, ‘it’s ground-shaking powerful.’
Members of the San Francisco-based art and music collective Space Cowboys. The Mog was a group effort. ‘We just want to create our own sound, our own vibe, and to share it with our friends and our community,’ says Mr. Hwang. ‘And mobility is a huge part of it.’
CAPTIONS<br>

Steve Hwang, a member of the San Francisco-based art and music collective Space Cowboys,’ with the group’s Mog—a fully-mobile sound and video party machine—photographed here in Oakland, Calif.

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Members of the San Francisco-based art and music collective Space Cowboys. The Mog was a group effort. ‘We just want to create our own sound, our own vibe, and to share it with our friends and our community,’ says Mr. Hwang. ‘And mobility is a huge part of it.’ JASON HENRY FOR THE WALL STREET JOURNAL
CAPTIONS
Steve Hwang, a member of the San Francisco-based art and music collective …
The Mog began life as a 1973 Mercedes Unimog 404. The vehicle was originally created as a military radio truck. On the Space Cowboy’s website, it is now referred to as an All-Terrain Audio Visual Assault Vehicle (an ATAVAV). JASON HENRY FOR THE WALL STREET JOURNAL
Members of the crew deploying the sound equipment. Up top: four stadium speakers that rise out of the cab on pneumatic lifts. JASON HENRY FOR THE WALL STREET JOURNAL
‘Ripe is kind of a tag line that stuck,’ says Mr. Hwang. Members of the Space Cowboys collective had gotten ahold of a roll of ‘Ripe’ stickers that go on produce in a supermarket. ‘It’s become a bit of a mantra.’ JASON HENRY FOR THE WALL STREET JOURNAL
A look at the Mog’s onboard electrical closet. The truck utilizes four amplifiers: two 8,000-watt amps and two 4,000-watt amps. JASON HENRY FOR THE WALL STREET JOURNAL
Mr. Hwang in the back of the Mog, surrounded by four fold-out subwoofers. JASON HENRY FOR THE WALL STREET JOURNAL
The platform in front of the Ripe flag is what the DJ stands on during gigs. JASON HENRY FOR THE WALL STREET JOURNAL
The subwoofers fold into the cab for safe transportation. JASON HENRY FOR THE WALL STREET JOURNAL
Mr. Hwang drives the Mog to gigs. ‘It can crawl up a wall,’ he says. ‘In first gear, you get to about three mph. In second, maybe five. In third, you’re ready to roll.’ JASON HENRY FOR THE WALL STREET JOURNAL
An overhead shot of the cockpit. JASON HENRY FOR THE WALL STREET JOURNAL
Another view of the electrical equipment. ‘It’s not your typical home stereo setup,’ says Mr. Hwang of the Mog. JASON HENRY FOR THE WALL STREET JOURNAL
The booth usually holds one DJ at a time, but two can fit. JASON HENRY FOR THE WALL STREET JOURNAL
‘Needless to say,’ Mr. Hwang notes, ‘it’s ground-shaking powerful.’ JASON HENRY FOR THE WALL STREET JOURNAL
Members of the San Francisco-based art and music collective Space Cowboys. The Mog was a group effort. ‘We just want to create our own sound, our own vibe, and to share it with our friends and our community,’ says Mr. Hwang. ‘And mobility is a huge part of it.’ JASON HENRY FOR THE WALL STREET JOURNAL
CAPTIONS
Steve Hwang, a member of the San Francisco-based art and music collective Space Cowboys,’ with the group’s Mog—a fully-mobile sound and video party machine—photographed here in Oakland, Calif. JASON HENRY FOR THE WALL STREET JOURNAL

We outfitted the truck with eight 21-inch subwoofers in custom enclosures, and four all-weather stadium speakers mounted inside the cab that raise on a pneumatic lift. Concert-grade amplifiers, two 7,000-watt generators, a DJ booth—all of it is built-in.

I manage the truck, and I’ve driven it to Burning Man, to gigs in Squaw Valley, Los Angeles, Santa Rosa, and all over the Bay Area. It’s not your typical home-stereo setup. Our objective was to achieve a very high quality of sound, and to be able to take that quality sound wherever we want. We don’t break any speed limits when we’re on the road, but on flat pavement or moderate inclines, the Mog will cruise at 55 mph.

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Needless to say, it’s ground-shaking powerful. But our goal was never to be the biggest or loudest, or to compete with anyone. We just want to create our own sound, our own vibe, and to share it with our friends and our community. And mobility is a huge part of it.

Live recording at Melbourne Audio Club LOST

Sorry!  I had hoped to post the audio of the last meeting here.The only recording of the band has somehow been deleted.What makes it worse is that John claimed the sound of the drumming was fantastic.

Next time there is real live music we will borrow an old analogue direct to disc cutting lathe and make original master recordings. Or perhaps be a little more careful wirh the files.

Next meeting will demonstrate the Bluesound streamer and cd ripper, This is what appears in the next issue:

Bluesound – Not Your Average Wireless Multizone Audio

The designers at NAD and PSB have come up with a brilliant solution to the problem of high-res, whole-house audio that combines superb sound reproduction with twenty-first century connectivity. With six models in the Bluesound Gen 2 line up, the brands products are a significant step-up from Sonos and Bose, with all models capable of 24-bit/192 kHz music decoding and playback.

This month’s meeting we will have Convoy, the distributors for Bluesound, demonstrating two of their products. The Power Node 2 ($1499) and Vault 2 ($1999) both units offer similar functionality. Streaming audio from computers and NAS drives, Internet Radio and cloud -streaming services such as Tidal. The Power Node 2 streamer/amplifier uses Direct Digital amplifier technology, developed by NAD, to deliver 60W per channel. Speakers can be connected directly to the unit to create a room ‘zone’, all controlled with your tablet or smartphone.

The star of the Bluesound line up is the Vault 2, a CD ripper with 2TB of storage built in, with the ability to rip CDs in bit-perfect lossless FLAC without the need for a computer. It can search music from NAS drives or USB connected hard drives, as well as play back music to an existing Hi-Fi system via its stereo outputs or a coaxial digital out. With the Bluesound app and a tablet, you have the capability to add to your high-res music collection by downloading directly from Highresaudio Online Stores onto the Vaults hard drive.

Convoy will put together a system comprising of B&W speakers, a pair of CM6 S2s and the matching 10 inch subwoofer. The Bluesound system will demonstrate how mature this form of audio has become – the wireless transmission of music was once viewed as a novelty – it is now possible to do music over Wi-Fi up to 24-bit/96kHz, better than CD. With the slogan ‘Hi-Fi never went away, it just never went wireless’ Bluesound will appeal to a new group of audiophiles, will that be you?

Nick Karayanis

GARAGE SALE AT JOHN’S IN BOX HILL SAT 10TH OCTOBER

Garage sale tomorrow 10 OCTOBER, at John’s old shop in Middleborough Road. !2 noon to 2PM, bargains and offers on tuners, cd players, some turntables, speakers and drivers.

This is stuff that Ray doesn’t want at the new Hifi Exchange, don’t expect high-end stuff but you are sure to pick up a bargain.

Old and New Hifi Exchange

Ray told me on Saturday that a deal is pending to get access to Garrott Brothers stock currently in storage. The products include many high end cartridges mostly retipped including Koetsu. Arms and other turntable items are on the list. This is still being negotiated, but if you are in the market for an arm or cartridge WATCH THIS SPACE.

VTL monoblock amps (KT88) on demo at the moment. $3600.

More- Ray also has access to a lot more high end gear, no list available, but if you’re looking for a valve pre or power amp, or unusual gear, drop Ray an email.

The old shop in Box Hill is being redecorated fo create a better camera showroom (and studio perhaps). Again, watch this space as I expect an enormous GARAGE SALE.

Three pictures of the recent Live Music event at Melbourne Audio Club
James Wakeling by Nick K

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